The Jung and the Restless

“Called or not called, the god will be there.” So Carl Jung observed, and indeed had carved above the entrance to his house, although of course he did it in Latin where it looks and sounds even cooler. I don’t claim to be an expert in matters Jungian, so the best I can do is to explain what I have taken away from his writings, and how I have applied them to my spiritual life.

Carl Jung believed that the gods – these archetypal figures – lie within the human unconscious, perhaps rising up from the even deeper waters of the collective unconscious, a kind of deep group mind, even group experience and history, that humans share. For myself, I know that the figures of these archetypal gods do exist in my subconscious, and I suspect the existence of the collective unconscious, based on no more than my instincts and my (admittedly biased) experience.

What can I tell you? This view is not for everyone, but that’s fine. An old therapist used to joke that I was “a poster boy for Jungian dream interpretation,” and my goodness, is it true. My dreaming life proceeds along the geography of a thoroughly, vividly Jungian landscape. Even as I proceeded to think along these lines, I knew – intuitively, in that way that does not demand evidence – that the path of my journey of faith went inside my own head, and hopefully into those deeper, divine waters, the place where pantheism and the collective unconscious met.

I closed my eyes, and Odin was there. Called or not.

Author: hammertales

Honi soit qui mal y pense.

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